Sunday, March 9, 2014

Afternoon Tea... Featuring Charm of Home and Rose Chintz Cottage...

 


Tea and Roses

There has been so many lovely blogs that I have visited that share my love and interest
Of tea and all the beautiful china cups and teapots!

I love to visit them and get inspired of the days gone by;
But I feel that there is a special part of us that long for the
Tranquility and Peace...

Here are a couple of my most favorites:


Please stop in and visit these wonderful Blogs;

The Charm of Home is a lovely lady named Sherry!
She will inspire you; and she has some gluten free recipes to share!

Rose Chintz Cottage is also a very kind lady named Sandi!
She loves her tea parties, also!
And she also shares yummy treats!








A typical afternoon tea began after the lunch dishes were cleared by the servants and the lady of the house summoned her maid to join her upstairs to change into her tea gown. Meanwhile, downstairs in the kitchen, the cooks prepare scones, biscuits, small sandwiches and tea cakes. The family and their guests took tea in the drawing room at 5:00 p.m. In Britain, the drink of choice is black tea taken with milk and sugar. To keep up with social status, the food served was designed to impress the guests. The presence of an overly accessorized table with fancy French patisseries, delectable cakes, puddings and fine chocolates.



For aristocrats in the Edwardian era, women attended estate dinners wearing extravagant gowns, silk gloves and hats, while the gentlemen were fashionably attired in tuxedos. Each meal carried its own dress code, and in some instances, women would change several times a day depending on the occasion. In those days, a woman often had a maid to help her dress. To assist in the beauty of the female figure, women relied on tight-laced corsets to create an hourglass shape. Ladies of high society dressed for an afternoon tea in fanciful tea gowns and floral bonnets embellished with pastel ribbons and roses that emulated the shades of a summer bouquet. All across Europe, roses were a constant theme in tearoom decorating, accoutrements and fabrics; trellises of roses even helped transport an English garden indoors.


Romantic Homes Magazine wrote these above pharagraphs!




7 comments:

NanaDiana said...

What a wonderful post, Roxy. I am off to visit! xo Diana

Ren said...

Thanks, I'm always looking for good blogs!

Jo said...

Its interesting about the time the British took tea at 5pm as it meant they had dinner (their evening meal) very late in the evening and stayed up late at night and rising late in the following morning. No wonder women like Beatrice Potter made the comment that she didn't want to spend the rest of her life eating afternoon tea as it must have got a bit much after a while.

I enjoy my tea at breakfast , lunch and supper.

Amy said...

Good Morning from the homestead!

What a lovely post! I love being able to follow new blogs that have yummy recipes and such to share..

Off to visit now....

Enjoy your day on the beach, I hope it's warm there today. :)

Miss you,
Amy

The Charm of Home said...

Hi Roxy,
Thank you for the mention. I am really loving tea. I never tried to narrow down the topics on the blog but, I am doing more tea now because I just love to learn and blog about it.
Sherry

Blackberry Lane said...

What a lovely post, Roxy. I just came from Stephanie's blog and saw the adorable apron you gifted her. John and I often enjoy a cup of tea in the afternoons.

Elizabeth N said...

I grew up having tea with my grandma who was from Canada. Tea from a teapot into bone china tea cups. No mug in a microwave for her!

I have quite collection of cups and pots which I am sure will make their way onto my blog :)

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